Share to facebook Share to twitter Share to linkedin Cawthron Institute scientist Mike Packer in algal growth room. Cawthron Institute A team at the Nelson Artificial Intelligence Institute has developed technology they claim can detect tiny algal cells in the ocean before they multiply to create toxic algal blooms. Toxic algal blooms, also know as ‘red tides’, are
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Humpback whales feed on fish—and microplastics—in Alaska. Getty Microplastics are found everywhere, from remote wilderness to the depths of the sea. They can alter growth of our agricultural crops. Recently, researchers Gloria Fackelmann and Dr. Simone Sommer of Ulm University conducted an extensive review covering how ingested microplastic causes an imbalance in the gut microbiomes of animals
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JAKARTA, Indonesia — Indonesian satellite operator Pasifik Satelit Nusantara (PSN) plans to continue its ongoing fleet expansion with a new satellite carrying 300 gigabits per second of capacity by 2023.  Dani Indra Widjanarko, director of planning and development at PSN, said the company is still designing the satellite — which would increase its fleet size
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I spend a lot of time pointing out that weather and climate are different. I often use the analogy that “weather is your mood, and climate is your personality.” Scientists (and scientifically-literate people) are usually stunned by comments framing day-to-day weather variability as some type of litmus test for the validity of anthropogenic climate change.
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JAKARTA, Indonesia — When GapSat exited stealth mode in 2014, the company sought to match satellite operators in need of short-term capacity with underutilized satellites from other operators.  GapSat found, however, that too often satellite operators searching for extra capacity didn’t actually need to borrow an entire satellite.  “They would have to lease a satellite
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In the bewildering quagmire that is the gas between the stars, the Hubble Space Telescope has identified evidence of ionised buckminsterfullerene, the carbon molecule known colloquially as “buckyballs”. Containing 60 carbon atoms arranged in a soccer ball shape, buckminsterfullerene (C60) occurs naturally here on Earth – in soot. But in 2010, it was also detected in
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Tournear will be ‘dual-hatted’ as SDA acting director and assistant director for space at the office of the undersecretary of defense for research and engineering, LOS ANGELES — Derek Tournear, assistant director for space at the office of Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering Mike Griffin has been named acting director of the Space
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On April 24, 2019, the Hubble Space Telescope celebrated its 29th year in orbit by premiering a never-before-seen view of the Southern Crab Nebula. Even after all these years, Hubble continues to uncover the mysteries of the universe. These are a few science achievements from Hubble’s latest year in orbit. Learn more about Hubble at
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Just as SpaceX CEO Elon Musk prepared for the “most difficult launch” of his rocket company with Falcon Heavy rocket, the space-enthusiast changed his display picture on Twitter from an alcoholic monkey to that of an astronaut sipping hot coffee on Mars. The picture uploaded on Monday shows an astronaut, leaning against what looks like
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SAN FRANCISCO – LeoLabs, a space situational awareness startup, has created a tool to help the New Zealand Space Agency (NZSA) continuously monitor satellites in low Earth orbit, LeoLabs and NZSA announced June 25. The cloud-based Space Regulatory and Sustainability Platform relies on information from LeoLabs’ network of phased-array radars to track satellites in low
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Tucked away in a remote valley of Brazil’s Serra da Capivara National Park, a group of bearded capuchin monkeys use round quartz stones to crack open cashew nuts on tree roots or other rocks. Beneath their feet, archaeologists have found at least 3,000-years-worth of discarded tools. The chimpanzees of Côte d’Ivoire have been using stone tools like
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Scientists have recreated Titan-like conditions in a lab, and found that organic molecules from Titan’s atmosphere could be forming rings of alien crystals around the methane lakes that dot the Saturn moon’s surface. Previously, the team led by researchers at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory had discovered two of these ‘molecular minerals’. Now they’ve discovered a
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A false-color, near-infrared view of Titan’s northern hemisphere collected by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, shows the moon’s seas and lakes. Orange areas near some of them may be deposits of organic evaporite minerals left behind by receding liquid hydrocarbon. NASA / JPL-Caltech / Space Science Institute Titan is a weird place. Bigger than the planet Mercury,
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WASHINGTON — A SpaceX Falcon Heavy lifted off early June 25 carrying two dozen small satellites on a mission to demonstrate the rocket’s capabilities for the U.S. Air Force. The Falcon Heavy lifted off at 2:30 a.m. Eastern from Launch Complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. The launch took place three hours into a
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When NASA’s InSight descends to the Red Planet on Nov. 26, 2018, it’s guaranteed to be a white-knuckle event. Rob Manning, chief engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, explains the critical steps that must happen in perfect sequence to get the robotic lander safely to the surface. Download this video: https://images.nasa.gov/details-JPL-20181031-INSIGHf-0001-InSight%20Landing%20on%20Mars.html
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(Photo: Getty Images) Getty What’s up with headlines calling Vyleesi a “female Viagra”? Yes, both medications begin with the letter “V” and are designed to address sex-related health issues. But there are real hard differences between these two medications.   The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved Vyleesi, generically known as bremelanotide, to “treat acquired, generalized hypoactive
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A new supercomputer model could help astronomers find spiraling, merging systems of two supermassive black holes. These mergers happen often in the universe, but are hard to see. Watch as the simulation reveals the merger’s brighter, more variable X-rays. https://go.nasa.gov/2OsaMAs Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center Music: “Games Show Sphere 01” from Killer Tracks This
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